Born in Port Au Prince, Fritz St. Jean (1954 - 2017) emerged as one of Haiti's most illustrious self-taught artists. Initially, his style consisted of painting animal and jungle scenes on canvas. However, in 1980, St. Jean broke away from the staid pastoral themes to memorialize his hopes and dreams for Haiti through his paintings. Being widely viewed as socio-political commentaries on the dichotomous realities of Haitian life, St. Jean's paintings transport the viewer to scenes of mysticism, idealism, and humanity all in one. He is noted as a master in color and detail as his works are continuously punctuated by the use of bold colors and fine lines. Often, his paintings celebrate Haiti's culture and encapsulate its rich history. Paying tribute to a country that was once called La Perle des Antilles (The Pearl of Antilles due to its natural beauty and countenance), St. Jean's paintings are artistic love notes to his homeland.  Suffice it to say, Haiti was the source of St. Jean’s inspiration.  

Fritz St. Jean had made notable achievements throughout his artistic career.  Mr. St Jean's works were featured in the landmark exhibition “The Sacred Arts of Haitian Voodoo” at the American Museum of Natural History in 1998.  Not to mention, his work has been published in many art books and exhibited at various art institutions worldwide, including shows in France, Italy, Kenya, and Switzerland.